Alzheimer's

Caregiving: a verb, not a definition.

It should be easy for a caregiver to see themselves as a verb..., after all, they’re doing something.

People taking care of a one with Alzheimer’s disease constantly bounce between dozens of tasks: driving an elder to their doctor’s appointments, cooking dinner, working a day job, making a loved sure one takes their medications.

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You may be asking yourself, “Where do I find support? ”

Possibly the most commonly-asked caregiver questions is also one of the hardest to answering part since the response will vary from person to person.

Some folks can immediately rattle off the names of the women and men in their lives who are waiting in the wings; poised to assist them whenever called upon. Nevertheless, many care providers find themselves at the opposite position; desperately seeking someone to give them a helping hand or sympathetic shoulder.

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Caregiver Support isn't One-Size-Fits-All with regards to assisting dementia care providers, the traditional “onesize- fits-all” approach to caregiver support can be woefully inefficient, based on a latest investigation.

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Individuals caring for a precious one with Alzheimer’s must make their very own physical, psychological and emotional health a priority. It might seem counter-intuitive to the newly-minted caregiver, however a precious one’s health and well-being is closely attached to their caregiver’s own health and well-being.

You'll learn to manage the psychological and physical strain of caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, and discover how not to be defined by your role as a dementia caregiver.

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It’s an unfortunate reality of caregiving that the caregiver will probably always be a potential target for critique, especially from members of the family and buddies who don’t even understand what it’s like to look following a precious one with Alzheimer’s.

If you discover yourself in this situation, there are a few strategies you can employ to deal with any sharp opinions.

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(AND HOW TO CHANGE THEIR MINDS)

Once someone has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, a certain family member might start to stand out as the most natural fit to be the person therefore caregiver. A partner is generally the go to caregiver because of their husband or wife, although the number of siblings, proximity, monetary resources and personality kind might all factor in when determining that adult child will care for their cognitively impaired parent(s).

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Solid rhetoric skills are an essential asset for each Alzheimer's caregiver. Having the ability to efficiently discuss difficult dementia problems with the rest of the household can keep relationships strong, despite the challenges that arise when caring for an adult with Alzheimer's therefore.

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In case your cherished one's Alzheimer's has progressed to the point at which they're having trouble going to the toilet, feeding, clothing or washing themselves, or should they've health problems that demand specialized medical attention, then take care of a nursing home could be an option. Nursing homecare can be divided into two broad classes: basic and proficient.

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In case your cherished one can't live at home, a memory care unit for an assisted living community may be a viable choice.

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Adult daycare programs typically receive a bad rap; branded as glorified babysitting services that compromise the independence and dignity of aging adults, but day care programs can offer a much needed supply of respite care for Alzheimer’s care providers who want a break. Research from the University of Pennsylvania concluded that adult daycare might guard against caregiver stress in those looking following a cherished one with dementia.

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It is the stated desire of several adults to be capable to continue living in their home (or the residence of a family member) as they grow older, as opposed to move to an assisted living community or a nursing home. Sadly, Alzheimer's may throw a life size monkey wrench into the very plans to ageing place.

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As their household member progresses down the road of decline so care providers often find themselves in need of professional assistance to  look after their cherished one. There are a number of selections for care, depending upon just how much assistance your cherished one wants and a family plans to pay for it.

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