Medication Management

Medication Management

For an individual with memory problems caused by Alzheimer, therefore , adhering to a consistent medication regimen may be tricky. Caregivers frequently express that not only is it a challenge to get a cherished one to remember to take their prescriptions, its also hard to convince them they need medication in the first place.

Pill organizers with an alarm to remind your cherished one to take their medications (which ideally will send you a warning via email, text or phone call if they don't) can be useful. Nevertheless, the downside of such devices is they may be unplugged or turned off.

In case your cherished one is living at home, you can hire a professional caregiver to come and help them with their medications, just bear in mind that not all of in-home care providers may administer medications, only nurses. In case your cherished one resides in an independent living or assisted living community, personnel can be available to help with medication management.

Here are a few additional strategies that our care providers utilized to get their family members to take medications:

 

  • Try a reward system -- want a special treat before bedtime? Take your medication first.
     
  • I take the meds which can be found in liquid form and combine them with a sports drink and serve in a glass as the only thing to drink with meals. Those in pill form have been crushed and mixed with peanut butter and served on a cracker. Mother thinks its a treat and gobbles it up.
     
  • As every new challenge arises, it can help to accept that Moms Alzheimers' is progressing and I'm responsible for her well being since she cant be. Confrontation certainly doesn't work, does it? So we need to outmaneuver them.
     
  • Try placing the pill in some pudding, ice cream, anything they really prefer to eat.
     
  • Ask them why they don't want to take the medication, sometimes fixing those reasons may help. As an example, if a pill is too big and uncomfortable to swallow, ask their physician if they can switch to a easier to ingest brand.
     
  • The collection of tablets may be daunting and a reminder of how sick and you've become. Occasionally you've to prioritize. If she doesn't want to take a pill, maybe that's not as bad as skipping the diabetic control medication.
     
  • For swallowing issues, sometimes taking pills with a thicker liquid helps. Also, some pharmacies have products you can spray into their mouth before the pills, to make them go down easier.

Need immediate assistance? Call (858) 529-1886.

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