Care, Health and Placement Advice

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Sleep issues are a well-documented side effect of most manifestations of dementia, but are specifically common in people with Alzheimer’s disease. This presents a problem for care providers, since, if a cherished one isn’t sleeping, neither are they. “Very frequently, the lack of sleep is what causes a caregiver to look at putting a cherished one in a center,” states Maureen Bradley, LPN, CDP, director of the Alzheimer’s care plans at several skilled nursing facilities.

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The responsibilities of providing care to an elderly, disabled or ill loved one can be difficult to manage. There are numerous duties that must be managed in order to ensure your loved one is getting the care they need. Being a caregiver is a wonderful way to show your loved ones that you care and concerned about their well-being. However, the responsibilities of being a caregiver, especially without help from an in-home care provider, can also be overwhelming and stressful.

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The psychological changes that accompany Alzheimer’s not only impact a person’s capacity to recall past events, they may also dramatically alter their capability for communication. People with dementia have a tendency to use language that directly connects to their emotions and what they truly want to say than the rest of us do. “hey use words that wouldn’t typically be used within an ‘ordinary’ conversation. Here are ten tips to help keep conversations with a cognitively impaired loved one positive and productive:

 

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Alzheimer's is feared by us. We fear becoming the stereotype dementia patient: slumped in a wheelchair, staring out of the window, our own heads as blank as our gaze. From this fear, a strong and pervasive stigma is born. A stigma fueled by an absence of legitimate understanding of the realities of the disease. A stigma with a crippling ripple effect that contributes to the isolation of people with Alzheimer's disease and their families. Even longtime buddies can vanish when somebody is diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

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Seniors today are more independent, active and in better health than ever before. However, as the senior population grows, unfortunately, so does the epidemic of abuse and neglect. The elderly population is the most affluent, the fastest growing and the most vulnerable to abuse. In San Diego alone, there are more than 305,000 seniors aged 65 and older and statistics show that approximately one out of every twenty seniors will be a victim of abuse in their lifetime. Unfortunately, these statistics may be seriously low, because only 19% of elder abuse incidents are reported.

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When it comes to being an Alzheimer’s caregiver, foresight is essentially non-existent. There are many things that seem obvious after you’ve gone through them with a loved one who has the disease, but that you’d never have considered, prior to experiencing them.

Even the world’s leading experts in Alzheimer’s don’t know everything there is to know about the disease. In fact, very little is certain when it comes to the ailment’s causes and underlying pathology.

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What’s the Difference?

As our loved one ages, one of the questions that may come up for your family is how to tell the difference between the cognitive changes associated with “normal aging” and those that could signal serious underlying health conditions.

At this time, there’s no definitive way to distinguish between benign memory slips, Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Consider this as a general rule of thumb: occasionally misplacing the car keys is normal, while forgetting what to do with them is not.

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May is the month for celebrating two of the most undervalued providers of in-home care-moms and nurses. They spend time walking, standing, lifting and bending for long periods of time each and every day. They are continually in contact with hazardous as well as not so pleasant substances, yet both moms and nurses magically manage these unpleasant encounters with a smile in their heart and a look of “it’s going to be okay” on their faces.

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Many people, especially seniors, tend to slow down and stay indoors more during the winter, so when spring finally makes its appearance, it may be difficult to get out of some of those winter habits. Spring is the perfect time to enjoy the outdoors and start a more active lifestyle. Although the key to maintaining good health is to stay active all year round, the cold, snow and ice can make it difficult for the elderly to get out.

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February is known for celebrating Valentine’s Day; the day when we observe the loved one’s in our life, but February is also American Heart Month. Unfortunately, heart disease claims approximately 2300 lives every day; according the American Heart Association that’s about 1 in every 3 deaths in the US. The good news is…with just a few simple lifestyle changes, heart disease is preventable. Here are a few tips to help you get started on the journey to a happy, healthy heart. Read More