Care, Health and Placement Advice

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The Intricate arena of Alzheimer&rsquo health care will require you or your cherished one to socialize with a wide array of physicians and doctors: geriatricians, gerontologists, geriatric psychiatrists, geriatric nurse practitioners, neurologists and neuropsychologists, to mention a couple.

 

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Studies have shown that more than 2 million people over the age of 65 struggles with depression. Unfortunately, when many people think of depression, they associate it with sadness; however, sadness isn’t the only sign; in fact, many seniors suffering with depression may not appear to be sad at all. It is also a misconception that depression or the signs of depression are simply a part of the aging process.

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Medical knowledge is minimal with regards to the facts of Alzheimer's disease. The cause and Cure of the disease remain powerful, and elusive therapies and remedies are difficult to discover. This lack of concrete knowledge, along with the stress and desperation engendered by Alzheimer's, can make controlling your worries a cherished ones health care extremely challenging.

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The following are three caregiver tips to help a person with Alzheimer's sleep better. Take into consideration their environment and sleeping habits.

Taking care of a loved one with Alzheimer's disease can take stressful. Knowing family tensions can escalate, it is best to take into consideration these tips to reduce the chances of conflict.

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Natural and man-made disasters are an inevitable part of life. The United States population consists of about 47 million seniors, which means that approximately 14.5 % of Americans are aged 65 and older. Unfortunately, when it comes to disasters, seniors are often the most affected given their physical condition and situation. Although there are limitations among the senior population, with proper planning seniors can increase their chance of survival.

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Sleep issues are a well-documented side effect of most manifestations of dementia, but are specifically common in people with Alzheimer’s disease. This presents a problem for care providers, since, if a cherished one isn’t sleeping, neither are they. “Very frequently, the lack of sleep is what causes a caregiver to look at putting a cherished one in a center,” states Maureen Bradley, LPN, CDP, director of the Alzheimer’s care plans at several skilled nursing facilities.

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The responsibilities of providing care to an elderly, disabled or ill loved one can be difficult to manage. There are numerous duties that must be managed in order to ensure your loved one is getting the care they need. Being a caregiver is a wonderful way to show your loved ones that you care and concerned about their well-being. However, the responsibilities of being a caregiver, especially without help from an in-home care provider, can also be overwhelming and stressful.

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The psychological changes that accompany Alzheimer’s not only impact a person’s capacity to recall past events, they may also dramatically alter their capability for communication. People with dementia have a tendency to use language that directly connects to their emotions and what they truly want to say than the rest of us do. “hey use words that wouldn’t typically be used within an ‘ordinary’ conversation. Here are ten tips to help keep conversations with a cognitively impaired loved one positive and productive:

 

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Alzheimer's is feared by us. We fear becoming the stereotype dementia patient: slumped in a wheelchair, staring out of the window, our own heads as blank as our gaze. From this fear, a strong and pervasive stigma is born. A stigma fueled by an absence of legitimate understanding of the realities of the disease. A stigma with a crippling ripple effect that contributes to the isolation of people with Alzheimer's disease and their families. Even longtime buddies can vanish when somebody is diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

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Seniors today are more independent, active and in better health than ever before. However, as the senior population grows, unfortunately, so does the epidemic of abuse and neglect. The elderly population is the most affluent, the fastest growing and the most vulnerable to abuse. In San Diego alone, there are more than 305,000 seniors aged 65 and older and statistics show that approximately one out of every twenty seniors will be a victim of abuse in their lifetime. Unfortunately, these statistics may be seriously low, because only 19% of elder abuse incidents are reported.

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