Care, Health and Placement Advice

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Caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease can be extremely challenging and stressful. Taking care of a loved one with Alzheimer's can ultimately result in many strong emotions. As the disease of your loved one progresses, family conflicts can arise. There are many strategies to help ease family tensions when your loved one has Alzheimer's disease and many ways in which you can care for your parent.

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Seniors face many changes as they age, such as the death of loved ones, retirement and medical problems. Unfortunately, these changes often lead to depression in the elderly. Depression not only prevents them from enjoying life like they used to, but it also impacts sleep, appetites, energy and their physical health. It is important to understand that depression is not normal grieving, nor is it a routine symptom of aging. Many seniors are resistant to talking about the way they are feeling, because they don’t want to burden their families.

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It's difficult to witness the deterioration of physical or mental abilities in an aging parent, grandparent or other loved one. Whether or not we're well-equipped or prepared, the reality remains that many of us will be tasked with making impactful decisions associated with caring for an elderly loved one. Since 80 to 90 percent of elderly people would choose to reside in their own homes as long as possible, as opposed to a nursing home or independent care, the new role for elderly caregivers can be challenging.

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During November, the home care and hospice community honor the millions of nurses, home care aides, therapists, and social workers who make a remarkable difference for the patients and families they serve. These heroic caregivers play a central role in our health care system and in homes across the nation.  And as the Baby Boomers age, the role of the home health care worker will become increasingly important.

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Starting January 1, 2016, new regulations go into effect for Home Care Organizations and Aides that are designed to protect consumers.  It’s called the Home Care Services Consumer Protection Act (A.B. 1217) and it requires all Home Care Organizations to be licensed, even those who do not provide medical care.

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A recent survey discovered most Americans do not understand the risk of needing and the costs associated with long-term health care.  Experts esitmate that approximately 70% of Americans will need long-term care in their lifetimes but are totally unprepared when it comes to understanding the costs involved.

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As healthcare costs and life expectancy ages continue to rise, covering the costs of healthcare as one approaches retirement age can cause an enormous amount of stress, not only for the individual, but sometimes for their family caregivers as well.  Some assume that Medicare will be able to cover the costs, but the reality is Medicare often cannot cover everything an individual might need, especially if in-home health care is needed.  The best way to combat this stress is to start now to create a strategy to save and manage your healthcare in retirement.

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Chances are you, or your loved who you are caring for, has some old, unused, or expired medications in your medicine cabinet or drawer.  It is necessary to pay attention to the expiration dates on all medications as the chemical composition of the medication could have changed or the medicine simply becomes less effective making it unsafe to take, especially when you're counting on the medicines to do what they're supposed to.  Whether it's prescription medication or over the counter medication, there is a right way to dispose of expired medications.

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It's difficult to witness the deterioration of physical or mental abilities in an aging parent, grandparent or other loved one. Whether or not we're well-equipped or prepared, the reality remains that many of us will be tasked with making impactful decisions associated with caring for an elderly loved one.  Since 80 to 90 percent of elderly people would choose to reside in their own homes as long as possible, as opposed to a nursing home or independent care, the new role for elderly caregivers can be challenging.

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Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks.  Alzheimer's is not a normal part of aging, although the greatest known risk factor is increasing age, and the majority of people with Alzheimer's are 65 and older. But Alzheimer's is not just a disease of old age. Up to 5 percent of people with the disease have early onset Alzheimer's (also known as younger-onset), which often appears when someone is in their 40s or 50s.

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