Care, Health and Placement Advice

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Members of the family of aging adults normally traveling one of two paths to becoming a caregiver: the abrupt sprint, or the gradual march. The abrupt sprint towards providing care for a precious one is frequently put off by an unexpected event--a stroke, a fall, complications from surgery--which acts as a catalyst, escalating your family member’s maintenance requires practically overnight.

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As your parents and other loved one's age, you may notice that their mobility is beginning to decline. This is common and is simply one of the issues with aging, but it can be extremely distressful for both you and your elderly loved one. Even small, minor difficulties for your elderly loved ones can have a significant impact on their life.

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November is National Long-Term Care Awareness Month. Long-term awareness month is a time to recognize and show support for both seniors who are receiving long-term care and for those who are providing long-term care. This type of care is overwhelming for seniors and their caregivers as they figure out how they are going to pay for care, what role the family members play in providing care and when and who should make the decision that senior loved ones need extra help.

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Caring for your aging parents can be touching, but it can also be an overwhelming and stressful situation, but when you include sibling rivalry into the mix, the situation can become extremely emotional and physically draining. When adult siblings become aware of the fact that their parents aren’t “themselves” and they need help, it’s common for the old roles and the competitiveness of siblings to resurface.

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Many seniors have a tendency to avoid discussing their care needs and future plans with their family members. Even though broaching the subject of making a maintenance plan can be hard, this is a crucial initial measure for successful aging and caregiving.

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Even though the majority of states have lifted their “shelter-in-place” orders, the risk for seniors contracting the virus still remains high. So, for this reason, for their safety, older adults are remaining at home unless it’s absolutely necessary for them to venture out. Unfortunately, this means that many seniors aren’t able to do the activities and be connected like they were before COVID-19.

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Visiting your elderly parents is when you spend time catching up on each other’s lives and sometimes the visits are shorter than you would like them to be. So, it can be difficult to recognize some of the signs that your aging parents may need a bit of outside help. In many situations, the changes in behavior happen gradually and subtly. Unfortunately, many elderly people are also hesitant about voicing their concerns, especially when it is about needing help.

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Adult daycare programs typically receive a bad rap; branded as glorified babysitting services that compromise the independence and dignity of aging adults, but day care programs can offer a much needed supply of respite care for Alzheimer’s care providers who want a break. Research from the University of Pennsylvania concluded that adult daycare might guard against caregiver stress in those looking following a cherished one with dementia.

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It is the stated desire of several adults to be capable to continue living in their home (or the residence of a family member) as they grow older, as opposed to move to an assisted living community or a nursing home. Sadly, Alzheimer's may throw a life size monkey wrench into the very plans to ageing place.

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Aging is a natural part of life; it’s also natural for seniors to need help and support with everyday lives. Unfortunately, many elderly people refuse to acknowledge that they may need a little extra help. Whether it’s needing assistance with personal care, such as bathing, needing help with transportation or even medication reminders; it is common for elderly adults to avoid asking for help. Encouraging elderly adults to get outside help is actually one of the most common and difficult challenges that adult children face.

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