Care, Health and Placement Advice

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Even as adults, children look at their parents as strongest, most caring and independent people they know. Unfortunately, there will come a time when your parent’s age impacts their health and the parent/child roles become reversed. If you are caring for your elderly parents or are in the beginning stages of caring for your parent’s, it’s important to know that you aren’t alone, there are more than 40 million caregivers in the U.S. and 90 percent of them are caring for an aging loved one.

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Heart disease is one of the top leading causes of death in women; one in four American women die from heart disease. Unfortunately, even with knowing the statistics, it’s common for women to wait significantly longer than men before seeking emergency care for a heart attack, and oftentimes their symptoms are misdiagnosed when they arrive at the hospital.

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If you are noticing signs that your senior parent may be struggling with keeping up around the house or with their personal care, you are most likely thinking about getting the help of caregivers. Considering the help of in-home caregiver for your elderly loved one may be a difficult decision and it becomes even more difficult when your senior loved one is refusing to accept caregiving help because of guilt.

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Members of the family of aging adults normally traveling one of two paths to becoming a caregiver: the abrupt sprint, or the gradual march. The abrupt sprint towards providing care for a precious one is frequently put off by an unexpected event--a stroke, a fall, complications from surgery--which acts as a catalyst, escalating your family member’s maintenance requires practically overnight.

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The holiday season is thought to be the most wonderful time of the year. It’s the time of the year when the family gets together, it’s a time for happiness, thankfulness, and faith. Unfortunately, due to the threat of COVID-19, this holiday season may be a little different.  Caregiving can sometimes be extremely challenging any time of the year, but with the challenges that tend to come with the holidays and when you add the pandemic into the mix, this holiday season may seem like things are impossible.

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Creating and applying a qualified family caregiving plan should include the support and input of your precious one, members of the family, buddies and elder care professionals. The whole team should be involved with putting this plan set up. All members of the staff don't necessarily have to be present for the first meeting, but having an elder care specialist participate might help to convince a resistant cherished one which it's time to address their present and future needs.

Members of the care staff might include:

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Caring for your aging parents can be touching, but it can also be an overwhelming and stressful situation, but when you include sibling rivalry into the mix, the situation can become extremely emotional and physically draining. When adult siblings become aware of the fact that their parents aren’t “themselves” and they need help, it’s common for the old roles and the competitiveness of siblings to resurface.

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Many seniors have a tendency to avoid discussing their care needs and future plans with their family members. Even though broaching the subject of making a maintenance plan can be hard, this is a crucial initial measure for successful aging and caregiving.

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Although states, cities and counties are starting to open back up, there is still a potential risk of being exposed to COVID-19. Older adults have a significantly higher risk for severe illnesses, including coronavirus. There are other factors that may also increase the risk for severe illnesses, such as having an underlying medical condition.

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Caregiving: a verb, not a definition.

It should be easy for a caregiver to see themselves as a verb..., after all, they’re doing something.

People taking care of a one with Alzheimer’s disease constantly bounce between dozens of tasks: driving an elder to their doctor’s appointments, cooking dinner, working a day job, making a loved sure one takes their medications.

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