Parents http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/ en When you're loved one has Alzheimer's and you are the Caregiver http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/article/when-youre-loved-one-has-alzheimers-and-you-are-caregiver <span property="schema:name">When you&#039;re loved one has Alzheimer&#039;s and you are the Caregiver</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2021-07-19T16:37:13+00:00">Mon, 07/19/2021 - 09:37</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img property="schema:image" src="/sites/default/files/d8/thumbnail/article/parent-alzheimers-caregiver.jpg" width="768" height="512" alt="Dad with Alzheimer&#039;s" title="Parent with Alzheimer&#039;s" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" /> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p data-pm-slice="1 1 []" dir="auto">You may have the urge to reprimand your loved one for forgetting things. That is a natural reaction, but it will not help. Instead, try to find ways to encourage them to go on and enjoy their day.</p> <p dir="auto">My Dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 1995 when he was 64 years old. He was a successful businessman who owned a chain of grocery stores and had no time or patience for his children or their accomplishments. He worked seven days a week and expected everyone else to do the same.</p> <p dir="auto">He stopped driving at 65 so we knew something was wrong before the diagnosis, but he kept insisting that he wasn't sick, just tired. He would stay up until 3 am reading the Wall Street Journal on his computer and then argue with me about why I should be home studying instead.</p> <p dir="auto">"To be a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease is to be a caretaker and protector. We are their advocate, their cheerleader, their coach, and the one who comforts them when they are scared."</p> <p dir="auto">This quote speaks to the difficulties of caring for someone who is suffering from Alzheimer's disease. They need your help to do what they want or need to do everyday. This can be difficult if they are not a person who was responsible in the past. So as a caregiver you should try and remember that it takes patience and understanding.</p> <p dir="auto"><a href="https://1stmeridiancareservices.com/alzheimers" title="Alzheimer's articles">Click here to learn more about caring for those with Alzheimer's.</a></p> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 19 Jul 2021 16:37:13 +0000 admin 133 at http://1stmeridiancareservices.com Aging-in-Place With Alzheimer's http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/article/aging-place-alzheimers <span property="schema:name">Aging-in-Place With Alzheimer&#039;s</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-03-18T07:00:00+00:00">Wed, 03/18/2020 - 12:00</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img property="schema:image" src="/sites/default/files/d8/thumbnail/article/aging-in-place-with-alzheimers.jpg" width="768" height="512" alt="Aging-in-Place With Alzheimer&#039;s" title="Residence of a family member with Alzheimer&#039;s" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" /> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It is the stated desire of several adults to be capable to continue <a href="https://1stmeridiancareservices.com/services/home-care" title="In-Home Care Services">living in their home</a> (<em>or the residence of a family member</em>) as they grow older, as opposed to move to an assisted living community or a nursing home. Sadly, Alzheimer's may throw a life size monkey wrench into the very plans to ageing place.</p> <p>Staying put in their home can turn into an prospect of your cherished one as they advance down the path of cognitive impairment. Forgetting to turn off the stove, neglecting to take a bath or wash their clothes on a daily basis, and leaving food in the refrigerator so long that it are only a few the dangerous scenarios that may happen when an individual with Alzheimer's resides on their own.</p> <p>Particularly for <a href="https://1stmeridiancareservices.com/services/placement-services" title="Long Distance Care Placement">long distance care</a> companies who live far away from their loved ones, determining when an individual degree of handicap has attained the point where they can no longer live in their home safely can be a tricky endeavor. Here are some questions to assist you analyze the situation:</p> <ul> <li>Are they socially isolated? Do they on a regular basis interact with buddies?</li> <li>Are they currently exhibiting signs of depression?</li> <li>Are they capable of bathing and dressing themselves?</li> <li>Are they properly performing regular chores (cooking, cleaning, laundry, buying groceries) on their very own?</li> <li>Are they paying their bills on time?</li> <li>Are they (and if they be) driving?<br />  </li> </ul> <p>If these questions send up red flags a precious one shouldn't continue living independently, moving them into your house may be a viable option, provided you keep a few things in mind.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Other members of the household</strong> - Whether it wont just be you or your cherished one with Alzheimer's in the house, its essential to examine the impact the move could have on other members of the household, particularly your significant other and your children. So called Sandwich Generation caregivers those looking after a parent, while caring for their kids often find themselves pulled in several distinct directions. Alzheimer's behaviors may also produce a great deal of confusion for young kids to comprehend why their elderly uncle suddenly starts screaming and hitting them for no clear reason, or become frightened when they come across grandmother as she roams the home during the night, muttering to himself. A spouse may also feel failed or betrayed when their husband or wife devotes much of their time and attention to an elder with Alzheimer's.<br />  </li> <li><strong>Finances</strong> - If you do decide to move a precious one into your property, its best to hammer out monetary arrangements in advance. Will you apply to obtain payment as their main caregiver? Will they contribute money to pay for family expenses? Since looking following an beloved one with Alzheimer's will require career sacrifices and certain financial by the rest of the household, the question of can I get paid for being a caregiver? is among the most commonly asked questions of potential (<em>and current</em>) care suppliers.<br />  </li> <li><strong>Your needs </strong>- As a caregiver, you may only handle so much with respect to both the emotional and practical facets of caring for a precious one with Alzheimer's at home. Wrestling with a husband who's 70 pounds heavier than you're while attempting to get him to take a shower is not something you're going to be capable to do on a long-term basis. If sun-downer's is causing your mother to continuously get up and wander around in the center of the night, alerting you of hours of sleep, then there's no way you can continue to safely care for her on your own. Attending and identifying to your very own requirements is a must-do for each Alzheimer's caregiver.</li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 18 Mar 2020 07:00:00 +0000 admin 90 at http://1stmeridiancareservices.com Coordinating the Relationship Between Aging Parents and Adult Children http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/article/coordinating-relationship-between-aging-parents-and-adult-children <span property="schema:name">Coordinating the Relationship Between Aging Parents and Adult Children</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2017-06-20T21:33:15+00:00">Tue, 06/20/2017 - 02:33</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img property="schema:image" src="/sites/default/files/2018-09/elderly_parents.jpg" width="350" height="208" alt="Coordinating the Relationship Between Aging Parents and Adult Children" title="Coordinating the Relationship Between Aging Parents and Adult Children" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" /> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It is common for adult children to face a wide range of problems when they are dealing with elderly parents. This is primarily due to the reversal of the parent-child relationship. As young children, your parents are who you relied on to tell you right from wrong, to make decisions for you and to protect you. As children become young adults, their relationship to their parents became “different”. You still turned to your parents, but more for support and guidance. Never do children imagine or expect that one day they would be the parent to their parent. One of the most difficult struggles with this reversal of parenting is coordinating the relationship towards a positive experience.</p> <h2>Focus on the Positive</h2> <p>As parents lose their close emotional relationship with their adult children, who have formed diverse relationships with their own children, it often results in a negative outcome. It is essential, however, for both the aging parent and the adult child to reduce the negative features and focus on more healthy, positive features of the relationship. With patience and understanding learning how to maintain a healthy, respectful relationship with your aging parent possible.</p> <h2>Maintaining a Healthy Relationship</h2> <p>It’s a given that you love your parents, but at times, maintaining the bond between an adult child and their aging parent can be challenging. It is important to keep in mind that both of you are confronting new challenges. While it’s to be expected that these changes will affect your relationship, it is essential to keep in mind that as you both change, your relationship must also change. Part of the changes in forging this new relationship includes forming a bond between mature adults instead of the parent-child bond relationship. You both already have the basics-shared memories and your love for each other, so when you add in mutual respect and common interests, you can find a more fulfilling relationship with your parents.  Some healthy ways to forge an adult relationship with parents and enhance a strong bond may include:</p> <ul> <li>Rediscovering and sharing mutual interests</li> <li>Being honest about who you are and what you want from the relationship</li> <li>Look for common activities</li> <li>Do not allow aging parents to channel guilt</li> <li>Expect and encourage independence for both you and your parent</li> </ul> <p>Studies have shown that the majority of parents and their adult children experience aggravation and tension with each other, but the parent-child relationship continues to be one of the longest lasting forms of social ties that humans establish. Regardless of the feelings of tension, ambivalence and irritation, the tie between aging parents and adult children is typically more supportive and positive than negative.</p> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 21:33:15 +0000 admin 43 at http://1stmeridiancareservices.com http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/article/coordinating-relationship-between-aging-parents-and-adult-children#comments 4 Father's Day Activities to Do With Elderly Dads http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/article/4-fathers-day-activities-do-elderly-dads <span property="schema:name">4 Father&#039;s Day Activities to Do With Elderly Dads</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2017-06-06T21:35:41+00:00">Tue, 06/06/2017 - 02:35</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img property="schema:image" src="/sites/default/files/2018-09/elderly-dads.jpg" width="640" height="431" alt="4 Father&#039;s Day Activities to Do With Elderly Dads" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" /> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>With their independence and strength fading away, many elderly fathers and grandfathers feel lost and possibly out of place. Father’s Day is the perfect opportunity to honor and celebrate them, but many people struggle with how to celebrate this special day. Whether you dad is living at home or in an assisted living facility, here are a few fun ideas for Father’s Day activities as well as some tips on how to prepare for your activities.</p> <h2>Spend the Day at the Park</h2> <p>If the weather is going to be nice, plan to spend the day at the park. You can make a day of it by packing a picnic lunch, going for a nature walk and playing a game or two. Remember to choose a location that is easy to walk to, has a nearby restroom and shaded areas. To make the day even better, bring the whole family along. If your dad is unable to leave his residence, you can still have a picnic lunch in the backyard or even near an open window.</p> <h2>Go to a Ball Game</h2> <p>Father’s day is in June, which is also a perfect time to catch a local ball game. If you are going to a professional ball game, make sure you order the tickets early and try to arrange something special, such as a message on the score board or a picture of him with the mascot. If there aren’t any major leagues playing near you simply search for little league games near you. Don’t forget the sunscreen and a hat to help prevent sunburn.</p> <h2>Have a Movie Marathon</h2> <p>If your dad is unable to get out, consider having a movie marathon. Ask him what his favorite movies were when he was younger or who his favorite vintage film stars are, then rent a few of his favorite movies or movies that have his favorite film star in them. Don’t forget the snacks and try to get the whole family involved.</p> <h2>Make a Memory Book</h2> <p>If you dad is unable to get out, one of the best ways to spend Father’s Day is to bring the memories to him. Get in touch when people whose life your dad has touched and ask them to send you an email or a letter, along with a photograph or two. Don’t forget to write your own letter and gather a few photographs as well. Plan to spend Father’s Day with your dad creating a memory book together. Remember to ask him questions about his relationship with each person that responded. After Father’s Day is over, your dad will not only have the memory of spending the day with you doing a special activity, but a memory book that he can reflect on.</p> <p>Spending quality time with your father gives you both an opportunity to simply enjoy each other’s company.  Whatever activity you choose to do, it will be a day worth remembering because the most important thing about Father’s Day is spending quality time with the favorite man in your life.</p> <p>(<a href="http://www.thekensingtonal.com/blog/fun-fathers-day-activities-for-elderly-dads-.aspx" target="_blank">Source</a>)</p> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 06 Jun 2017 21:35:41 +0000 admin 44 at http://1stmeridiancareservices.com http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/article/4-fathers-day-activities-do-elderly-dads#comments Tips on Traveling with Elderly Parents http://1stmeridiancareservices.com/article/tips-traveling-elderly-parents <span property="schema:name">Tips on Traveling with Elderly Parents</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2017-03-06T22:41:54+00:00">Mon, 03/06/2017 - 02:41</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img property="schema:image" src="/sites/default/files/2018-09/traveling-elderly-parents.jpg" width="640" height="426" alt="Tips on Traveling with Elderly Parents" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" /> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Traveling is an enriching experience for anyone at any age, and taking a vacation with your elderly parents is a great way for all of you to make some wonderful memories together. However, traveling with seniors also comes with some unique challenges. Take a look at some tips that can help ensure a smooth trip with an elderly parent.</p> <h2>Make a Doctor’s Appointment First</h2> <p>Before you travel far from home, it’s a good idea to visit your parent’s physician. If your parent has serious health conditions, then you’ll want to get assurance from their doctor that it’s safe for them to travel. Your parent’s doctor can also help you come up with a list of any accommodations that your parent might need.</p> <p>If your parent takes medication regularly, it’s a good idea to get refills for any prescriptions before you go. You don’t want to run out of a needed medication if you get delayed on your trip.</p> <h2>Request Special Services Early</h2> <p>Your parent may require special services on airplanes, busses, or trains, or at the place that you are planning to visit. Wheelchair service, disabled seating, and special meals all fall under the umbrella of special services. Whenever you make a reservation, ask to make sure that the accommodations your parent needs are available and request that they be included with your reservation.<br /> <br /> It’s especially important to request and confirm these accommodations early when you’re booking transportation. Once you’re on board, the airline, bus, or train staff doesn’t necessarily have to make special services available to passengers who haven’t requested them in advance. They may try to accommodate you anyway, but you shouldn’t count on it.</p> <h2>Look into Preplanned Tours</h2> <p>One way to get the most enjoyment out of your trip for the least amount of hassle is to look into preplanned tours of the area you’re visiting. Some travel agencies even offer tours specifically designed for people who are elderly or disabled.</p> <p>Winging it can be fun when you’re young and able-bodied, but it can be harder on seniors and their caregivers. Taking a preplanned tour cuts down on the amount of special accommodations you have to make – just discuss them with the tour company and let them take care of the rest. Preplanned tours also relieve you of the stress of planning an itinerary.</p> <p>With some careful advance preparation, you and your parent will have a fantastic vacation that you’ll always remember.</p> <p>If you would like more information about our services, please call us (858) 529-1886.</p> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 06 Mar 2017 22:41:54 +0000 admin 47 at http://1stmeridiancareservices.com